How does lifestyle affect health?


Many health problems require a specific lifestyle. Gastroenterologist patients understand why they cannot eat fast food, and people with bronchial problems are likely to quit smoking after diagnosis. Unfortunately, many of our habits can aggravate existing diseases. And if everyone knows about the dangers of fatty foods, alcohol or tobacco, lack of sleep, constant stress or a sedentary lifestyle often seem like minor problems.

How does lifestyle affect health?

Unbalanced food affects not only the gastrointestinal tract, but the entire body: a lack of even one of the vitamins can lead to serious illness. The harm of ethyl alcohol and nicotine to the human body has long been proven: they negatively affect the digestive, respiratory, circulatory and nervous systems. Lack of rest lowers immunity, contributes to memory impairment and distraction of attention, aggravates existing diseases.

On the contrary, people with confirmed diagnoses often just need to change their lifestyle, and their diseases will manifest themselves much less. Often, in order to be healthy, you just need to eat a properly balanced diet, include a little physical activity in the fresh air in the daily routine, consume more fluid, sleep for 7-8 hours and avoid stress.


Healthy eating


Drink plenty of water. An adult needs about 8 glasses of liquid a day. This amount includes all beverages and liquid foods (such as soups). But it is better to replace strong tea and coffee with pure water. Try to get used to drinking a glass of water immediately after waking up: this allows you to wake up faster yourself and “wake up” the gastrointestinal tract.
Don’t skip breakfast. A hearty balanced meal in the morning will provide you with vigor and strength until lunchtime. Coffee and cake will not work: the best option would be to combine cottage cheese or eggs, porridge and fruits.

How does lifestyle affect health?


Review your eating habits. Nutritionists advise to make up each meal in this way: half a plate – fresh vegetables, a quarter – a side dish (porridge or starchy vegetables), and another quarter – protein (meat, cottage cheese, eggs or fish). If possible, get rid of sugar and sauces to get used to the natural taste of the food. Try to give up sweets, fast food and snacks: at first it will be hard, but after a week and a half, the craving for harmful foods will greatly decrease.
Eat on time. Try to stand at least two hours without food before bed. Distribute meals throughout the day so that there is no break for more than 3-4 hours. But at the first feeling of hunger, be sure to snack a little: this will reduce the risk of overeating during a full lunch or dinner.